audio journal + studio notes from composer + pink noises author tara rodgers aka analog tara

@ ~200 words
x 30-sec mp3
x 640x480 jpg

11th September 2011

Photo with 18 notes

i passed by this patch of green, with yellow flowers and red berries, in my neighborhood last sunday morning. it was buzzing with these sounds of crickets or cicadas. (i’m never sure who is sounding what, but here is a guide.) i had just watched this documentary on evelyn glennie, also featuring fred frith, and was thinking about something she said: that for everything we see, we associate a particular sound and imagine that sound even when we cannot hear it. in looking at this buzzing field, i wondered if that hypothesis tests out. in a sense, it does; here, one expects a field to buzz with insects in a particular way this time of year. yet, when i strained to see the sounding insects, or any movements associated with them, i couldn’t see them at all. this made me wonder whether r. murray schafer’s concept of schizophonia could be twisted to apply here—where sounds seem separated from their source not as an effect of human technological intervention, but as a strategy of communicating insects whose bodies remain concealed. schizophonia as an effect of insects’ technological interventions, if one considers their appendages as musical tools… glennie insightfully suggests that “the opposite of sound” is not silence but, rather, something akin to stillness or death. this helps to explain the aberrational effect of hearing the lively insects and sensing their rapid movements, but seeing a relatively still field of green. 

i passed by this patch of green, with yellow flowers and red berries, in my neighborhood last sunday morning. it was buzzing with these sounds of crickets or cicadas. (i’m never sure who is sounding what, but here is a guide.) i had just watched this documentary on evelyn glennie, also featuring fred frith, and was thinking about something she said: that for everything we see, we associate a particular sound and imagine that sound even when we cannot hear it. in looking at this buzzing field, i wondered if that hypothesis tests out. in a sense, it does; here, one expects a field to buzz with insects in a particular way this time of year. yet, when i strained to see the sounding insects, or any movements associated with them, i couldn’t see them at all. this made me wonder whether r. murray schafer’s concept of schizophonia could be twisted to apply here—where sounds seem separated from their source not as an effect of human technological intervention, but as a strategy of communicating insects whose bodies remain concealed. schizophonia as an effect of insects’ technological interventions, if one considers their appendages as musical tools… glennie insightfully suggests that “the opposite of sound” is not silence but, rather, something akin to stillness or death. this helps to explain the aberrational effect of hearing the lively insects and sensing their rapid movements, but seeing a relatively still field of green. 

Tagged: analog tarafield recordingcricketscicadasinsect soundsevelyn glenniefred frithr. murray schafer